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The First WOTI Forum Messages

These are the first messages sent via the WOTI mailing list, which went on-line late evening of April 9th, 1995. The very first WOTI message was posted by Eddie Guinn of Houston, Texas on April 10th, 1995.

As of WOTI's Tenth Anniversary, April 9th, 2005, approximately 182,000 WOTI messages have been distributed.


    Subject: Front forks on 1000
    From: Eddie Guinn
    Date: Mon, 10 Apr 1995 15:14:16 -0700
    
    I know someone has had a recent experience with 
    replacing the front seals cause I remember seeing the 
    post. Since I am finding fork oil where it shouldn't be 
    on my bike, I am interested in hearing from those who 
    have become experts on this topic. Especially things 
    that might make this an event I won't soon forget.
    
    -- 
    
     Eddie Guinn              |        ___   ~\
     Houston Tx               |       /%%%\~_=/\{   
     ******@ix.netcom.com     |        (0) === (0) 
                              |        78 GL 1000
    
    

    Subject: Re: Front forks on 1000
    From: John Fortini
    Date: Mon, 10 Apr 1995 18:53:43 -0400 (EDT)
    
    	I replaced mine on my "83" 1100 several times.  I finally found
    that the shaft of the fork had a couple of very small pits in it causing
    the seals to leak.  Be sure to check it out.  It could save you from doing
    the seals over again in a year or so. 
    
    On Mon, 10 Apr 1995, Eddie Guinn wrote:
    
    > ...(snipe)... I am interested in hearing from those who 
    > have become experts on this topic. Especially things 
    > that might make this an event I won't soon forget.
    > 
    
    

    Subject: Re: Front forks on 1000
    From: Dave Voorhis
    Date: Mon, 10 Apr 1995 17:18:55 -0500
    
    >I know someone has had a recent experience with 
    >replacing the front seals cause I remember seeing the 
    >post. Since I am finding fork oil where it shouldn't be 
     ^^^^
    Not on this list, surely.  This list has only been available since, oh,
    yesterday.  ;->
    
    >on my bike, I am interested in hearing from those who 
    >have become experts on this topic. Especially things 
    >that might make this an event I won't soon forget.
    >
    
    I did this last fall on my 1100.  However, I DID NOT disassemble the forks
    themselves by myself.  Everyone I spoke to suggested that this would require
    special tools or exceptional effort, and the $ saved wouldn't be worth the
    extra trouble.  I can give some tips on removing/reinstalling the forks, and
    some other bits on bearings and whatnot, too.  
    
    (Some of the following might be unique to the 1100, so YMMV:)
    
    - Get the shop manual, or a Haynes or Chiltons manual for the bike.  I've
    got the Haynes and wouldn't lift a wrench without it.
    
    - Make sure the bike is supported securely, with the front wheel about an
    inch or two off the ground.  I put mine on the center stand, and lifted it
    under the engine with a floor jack.  Once lifted, I placed an axle stand
    under the right footpeg mount and under a left side frame tube.  Don't rely
    on the floor jack to support the bike.  If you do, somebody'll inevitably
    come along and muck with it, thereby plopping the bike.  I've seen it happen.
    
    - When you remove the caps that hold the front axle to the forks, watch
    carefully to see which ones go on which side, AND which way they face.
    Don't get 'em backwards or mixed up when you put them back on.
    
    - If you remove the axle from the wheel to change the wheel bearings (which
    is a good idea, BTW, on a high mileage machine) keep track of the spacers
    and which side the nut goes on.  I had a shop replace the bearings for me
    (special tools again) and they put the axle back in for me, but mixed up the
    spacers.  That was worth a half hour of head scratching when nothing lined up...
    
    - If you decide to replace the steering head bearings (also a good idea if
    you've put more than a few miles on the existing ones), and you've got the
    caged roller kind, DO NOT attempt to pull the old one off the triple clamp
    and tube or press new one yourself.  Get a machine shop to do it, or you'll
    damage the bearing or the tube.  When the machine shop goes to press the new
    bearing on, you may wish to point out that the bearing should seat against
    the seal.  The machine shop I went to thought there _should_ be a shoulder
    for the bearing to seat against, and partially munged the seal trying to
    'fix' what warn't broke.  (BTW, the damage wasn't permanent, but I got the
    job done free because of it. ;-)
    
    The bearing surfaces in the frame can be pounded out with a hammer and an
    threaded rod or whatever as a drift.  Be careful not to damage the frame.
    The Haynes book recommends using a block of wood as a drift, but I couldn't
    find any wood hard enough to do the job.  It takes some serious whacking to
    get the brearing surfaces out.  Don't re-use them once you've removed them;
    only install new ones.
    
    - When putting new bearings back in the frame, pound them in STRAIGHT with a
    hammer and a block of wood as a drift.  The lower bearing surface probably
    won't seat all the way.  You can use the steering tube to pull the bearing
    in.  Install the tube and use the bolt to pull it and the bearing in.  This
    will seat the bearing surface in the frame.  Once it appears seated, remove
    it, and MAKE SURE it really is seated.
    
    - The handle bars can be conveniently supported out of the way by rotating
    them down in front of the bike, and then hanging them from the frame with
    strings or bent coat hangers.  Keep the handlebars upright, or brake fluid
    will probably leak out of the master cylinder.
    
    - Like I said before, I didn't take apart the forks themselves.  I took them
    to a local shop which had the right tools, and they installed them for about
    $30.00 over the price of the seals.  Having worked on forks before, it was
    DEFINITELY worth it.
    
    - When you remove the brake calipers, stick some thin pieces of wood in the
    gap normally occupied by the rotor.  That way the brake pistons won't pop
    out if somebody squeezes the brake lever.  Somebody ALWAYS squeezes the
    brake lever, BTW...
    
    Hope this helps.  Feel free to ask me if you have further questions.
    
    
    From the files of:
        _____________________     __ _______________   _________________ ______
       / ****@armchair.mb.ca \   / X/ Mad Despots   \ / Raving Lunatics \  Fish\
    +--                       ---------------------------------------------------,
    |Dave Voorhis,             DoD #1448          Brian: You are all individuals!|
    |Software Mercenary,       GWRRA #100777      Me:    I'm not.                |
    |Armchair Airlines Computer Services Inc.       Monty Python "Life of Brian" |
    |'82 CB900C '81 GL1100 '76 HD SS175 '72 HD Rapido '75 CJ5 '66 & '67 Toronados|
    
    

    Subject: Re: Front forks on 1000
    From: Robert E. Thornton
    Date: Mon, 10 Apr 1995 20:18:43 -0600 (MDT)
    
    Good hint there, John.  Thanx for the caveat, but a question for the group:
    
    Does this apply to 1100s only?
    
    Obvious answer:  
    
    In general, no.  But is there something about the forks on an 1100 that 
    _wouldn't_ apply to 1200s or 1500s?
    
    Robert
    Just a newbie on a GL1200-I,
    trying to learn all I can from
    the assmebled experience.
    
    Ride safe, y'all (those whose weather will allow it at all)  :->
    
    
    On Mon, 10 Apr 1995, John Fortini wrote:
    
    > 
    > 	I replaced mine on my "83" 1100 several times.  I finally found
    > that the shaft of the fork had a couple of very small pits in it causing
    > the seals to leak.  Be sure to check it out.  It could save you from doing
    > the seals over again in a year or so. 
    > 
    > On Mon, 10 Apr 1995, Eddie Guinn wrote:
    > 
    > > ...(snipe)... I am interested in hearing from those who 
    > > have become experts on this topic. Especially things 
    > > that might make this an event I won't soon forget.
    > > 
    > 
    
    

    Subject: Re: Front forks on 1000
    From: Robert E. Thornton
    Date: Mon, 10 Apr 1995 20:18:43 -0600 (MDT)
    
    Good hint there, John.  Thanx for the caveat, but a question for the group:
    
    Does this apply to 1100s only?
    
    Obvious answer:  
    
    In general, no.  But is there something about the forks on an 1100 that 
    _wouldn't_ apply to 1200s or 1500s?
    
    Robert
    Just a newbie on a GL1200-I,
    trying to learn all I can from
    the assmebled experience.
    
    Ride safe, y'all (those whose weather will allow it at all)  :->
    
    
    On Mon, 10 Apr 1995, John Fortini wrote:
    
    > 
    > 	I replaced mine on my "83" 1100 several times.  I finally found
    > that the shaft of the fork had a couple of very small pits in it causing
    > the seals to leak.  Be sure to check it out.  It could save you from doing
    > the seals over again in a year or so. 
    > 
    > On Mon, 10 Apr 1995, Eddie Guinn wrote:
    > 
    > > ...(snipe)... I am interested in hearing from those who 
    > > have become experts on this topic. Especially things 
    > > that might make this an event I won't soon forget.
    > > 
    > 
    
    

    Subject: Re: Front forks on 1000
    From: Dave Voorhis
    Date: Mon, 10 Apr 1995 20:35:06 -0500
    
    [Snip-a-Doo]
    
    >Robert
    >Just a newbie on a GL1200-I,
    >trying to learn all I can from
    >the assmebled experience.
    >
    >Ride safe, y'all (those whose weather will allow it at all)  :->
                       ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
    
    Oh sure!  Rub it in!
    
    But, hey, the weatherman predicts temperatures in the high 40's to low 50's
    (fahrenheit) for later in the week, AND my new engine guards just arrived.
    I'll be riding this weekend!  I will, I will!
    
    From the files of:
        _____________________     __ _______________   _________________ ______
       / ****@armchair.mb.ca \   / X/ Mad Despots   \ / Raving Lunatics \  Fish\
    +--                       ---------------------------------------------------,
    |Dave Voorhis,             DoD #1448          Brian: You are all individuals!|
    |Software Mercenary,       GWRRA #100777      Me:    I'm not.                |
    |Armchair Airlines Computer Services Inc.       Monty Python "Life of Brian" |
    |'82 CB900C '81 GL1100 '76 HD SS175 '72 HD Rapido '75 CJ5 '66 & '67 Toronados|
    
    

    Subject: Re: Front forks on 1000
    From: Robert E. Thornton
    Date: Mon, 10 Apr 1995 20:35:46 -0600 (MDT)
    
    More good stuff, Dave, and thanx for the warning on _possible_ 
    differences.  Can anybody make a definitive comment on variations between 
    fork assemblies amongs the different editions?
    
    On Mon, 10 Apr 1995, Dave Voorhis wrote:
    
    > >post. Since I am finding fork oil where it shouldn't be 
    >  ^^^^
    > Not on this list, surely.  This list has only been available since, oh,
    > yesterday.  ;->
    
    Ah, but a fine group of assembled personages, newness-be-dammed.
    
    > I did this last fall on my 1100.  However, I DID NOT disassemble the forks
    > themselves by myself.  Everyone I spoke to suggested that this would require
    > special tools or exceptional effort, and the $ saved wouldn't be worth the
    > extra trouble.  I can give some tips on removing/reinstalling the forks, and
    > some other bits on bearings and whatnot, too.  
    
    Is it too soon to think about a FAQ?  How about an assemblage of useful 
    posts?  This one in particular I'd like to save for future reference, but 
    I have a feeling that, once I start, I'm gonna run short of HD space real 
    quick. (Notice the sly reference to that _other_ brand.  :->
    
    > - Get the shop manual, or a Haynes or Chiltons manual for the bike.  I've
    > got the Haynes and wouldn't lift a wrench without it.
    
    You prefer the Haynes to the Chilton?  Why?  I have my own thoughts, but 
    would like to hear from the group on this as well.  (Dam, now I gotta go 
    look and see which one I got when I got this fine piece of mechanical 
    wonder.)
    
    
    > under the right footpeg mount and under a left side frame tube.  Don't rely
    > on the floor jack to support the bike.  If you do, somebody'll inevitably
    > come along and muck with it, thereby plopping the bike.  I've seen it happen.
    
    Truism #1?
    
    > - When you remove the caps that hold the front axle to the forks, watch
    > carefully to see which ones go on which side, AND which way they face.
    > Don't get 'em backwards or mixed up when you put them back on.
    
    How do you tell, assuming they've been mixed?
    
    
    > out if somebody squeezes the brake lever.  Somebody ALWAYS squeezes the
    > brake lever, BTW...
    
    Truism #2?
    
    Don't go away, we'll be right back.
    
    Robert
    
    

    Subject: Re: Front forks on 1000
    From: Dave Voorhis
    Date: Mon, 10 Apr 1995 20:40:38 -0500
    
    >Good hint there, John.  Thanx for the caveat, but a question for the group:
    >
    >Does this apply to 1100s only?
    >
    >Obvious answer:  
    >
    >In general, no.  But is there something about the forks on an 1100 that 
    >_wouldn't_ apply to 1200s or 1500s?
    >
    
    FWIW, there IS a significant difference between the forks on an 1000 and the
    others.  The 1000 doesn't have factory air forks, which should make it
    easier for the do-it-yourselfer to fix.
    
    
    From the files of:
        _____________________     __ _______________   _________________ ______
       / ****@armchair.mb.ca \   / X/ Mad Despots   \ / Raving Lunatics \  Fish\
    +--                       ---------------------------------------------------,
    |Dave Voorhis,             DoD #1448          Brian: You are all individuals!|
    |Software Mercenary,       GWRRA #100777      Me:    I'm not.                |
    |Armchair Airlines Computer Services Inc.       Monty Python "Life of Brian" |
    |'82 CB900C '81 GL1100 '76 HD SS175 '72 HD Rapido '75 CJ5 '66 & '67 Toronados|
    
    
And so on...

 

 

 

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